Top 10 similar words or synonyms for virtual_duopolies

emiralem    0.533046

disdainful_attitude    0.528024

levallois_bécon_eastbound    0.495407

dorsum_anteriorly    0.494695

obhas    0.494547

pplatform_level_southbound    0.491085

crueltie    0.487499

patronising_attitude    0.481270

brown_gradually_darkening    0.476677

xiangshan_daan    0.473008

Top 30 analogous words or synonyms for virtual_duopolies

Article Example
Local marketing agreement In response to criticism of the virtual duopolies and sharing agreements, the FCC began to consider potential changes to address these loopholes. In March 2013, the Commission first tabled a proposal that would make joint sales agreements count the same as ownership.
KNHL In 2014, Gray Television, owners of KOLN-KGIN and KSNB-TV, acquired Hoak Media; as it already owned the three aforementioned stations in the same market, it planned to sell KHAS to the shell company Excalibur Broadcasting and operate KHAS under a shared services agreement. As a result of growing FCC scrutiny towards "virtual duopolies", Gray instead let KHAS fall silent on June 13, 2014 and its programming and news operation were re-located to KSNB-TV, pending a sale of KHAS-TV to a minority owned broadcaster.
Duopoly (broadcasting) Some broadcasting companies have used loopholes to establish duopolies in smaller markets by way of a local marketing agreement, shared services agreement or joint sales agreement; where a station effectively brokers its entire airtime to the owner of another station in the market, which becomes responsible for handling its programming and advertising sales – and in effect, operations. These are termed as "virtual duopolies" as the station's license is held by one company, while its operations are handled by another. Through a 2014 FCC ruling, joint sales agreements in which the senior partner sells a minimum of 15% of the advertising time for its junior partner are counted toward ownership caps.
KAUZ-TV In August 2009, Drewry Communications – owners of the market's ABC affiliate KSWO-TV – purchased the non-license assets of KAUZ from Hoak and took over the station's operations through joint sales and shared services agreements (unlike most virtual duopolies, KAUZ and KSWO's operations largely remain separate). The JSA and SSA resulted in all four of the market's major network-affiliated stations – as well as the affiliates of all six of the largest English-language networks – now being operated by two entities (Nexstar Broadcasting Group owns NBC affiliate KFDX, while operating Mission Broadcasting-owned Fox affiliate KJTL and MyNetworkTV affiliate KJBO-LP through a shared services agreement). In February 2014, Hoak reached a deal to sell KAUZ's license assets to KAUZ Media, Inc., a company controlled by Bill W. Burgess, Jr.; the agreements with KSWO were to continue. This came after Hoak sold its other television properties to Gray Television in November 2013.
Local marketing agreement The increased use of sharing agreements by media companies to form consolidated, "virtual" duopolies became controversial between 2009 and 2014, especially arrangements where a company buys a television station's facilities and assets, but sells the license to an affiliated third-party "shell" corporation, who then enters into agreements with the owner of the facilities to operate the station on their behalf. Activists have argued that broadcasters were using these agreements as a loophole for the FCC's ownership regulations, that they reduce the number of local media outlets in a market through the aggregation or outright consolidation of news programming, and allow station owners to have increased leverage in the negotiation of retransmission consent with local subscription television providers. Station owners have contended that these sharing agreements allow streamlined, cost-effective operations that may be beneficial to the continued operation of lower-rated and/or financially weaker stations, especially in smaller markets.
KJCT-LP In the wake of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC)'s increased scrutiny towards virtual duopolies, Gray announced that it would move KJCT's programming to a subchannel of KKCO, and sell KJCT to a minority owned broadcaster, which will operate the station autonomously from KJCT or any other broadcaster. On August 27, 2014, Gray announced that it would sell KJCT to Jeff Chang and Gabriela Gomez-Chang, owner of KQSL. The new owners would change KJCT's call letters to KGBY. On October 21, 2014, the FCC approved a swap of virtual channels between KJCT/KGBY and a co-owned low-power station in Grand Junction, KKHD-LP (channel 20), that Gray was in the process of acquiring; as a result, KGBY, following the sale, uses PSIP to map to virtual channel 20, while KKHD inherited virtual channel 8, as well as KJCT's ABC programming. The swap is intended to reduce viewer confusion that would otherwise result from a move of ABC programming. The sale of the original KJCT's license assets was completed on December 15.
KGBY (TV) In the wake of the FCC's increased scrutiny towards virtual duopolies, Gray announced that it would move KJCT's programming to a subchannel of KKCO, and sell KJCT to a minority owned broadcaster, which will operate the station autonomously from KJCT or any other broadcaster. On August 27, 2014, Gray announced that it would sell KJCT to Jeff Chang and Gabriela Gomez-Chang, owner of KQSL. On October 28, 2014, the call sign became KGBY; this change was temporary and was reverted to KJCT in November 19, 2014, with the permanent change to KGBY slated to occur upon the completion of the sale. A week earlier, on October 21, the FCC approved a swap of virtual channels between KJCT/KGBY and a co-owned low-power station in Grand Junction, KKHD-LP (channel 20), that Gray simultaneously acquired; as a result, KGBY uses PSIP to map to virtual channel 20, while KKHD inherited virtual channel 8, as well as KJCT's ABC programming. The swap was intended to reduce viewer confusion that would otherwise result from a move of ABC programming. The sale was completed on December 15, at which point the KGBY call sign returned. Gray subsequently changed KKHD's call letters to KJCT-LP.
Local marketing agreement Public interest organizations have disapproved of the use of LMAs for virtual duopolies that circumvent the FCC's rules due to their effects on the broadcasting industry, particularly the results of consolidation through the irregular use of LMAs. In markets where duopolies are not legally possible, a company may elect to form one by purchasing a station's "non-license" assets (such as their physical facilities, programming rights, and other intellectual property), and selling the license itself to a third-party "sidecar" company (which is often affiliated with the purchaser), which in turn, enters into an LMA or a similar agreement with the senior partner. The FCC only recognizes ownership of television stations by the ownership of their license and facility ID, and not by the ownership of these "non-license" assets; this means that the senior partner becomes the "de facto" owner and operator of the station, but the sidecar is still the legal owner. Although the FCC determines a sidecar firm to be an independent entity from the company using it to outsource station operations for licensing purposes, the Securities and Exchange Commission does not make such a designation, requiring reports on sidecars to be included in a broadcaster's financial statements.