Top 10 similar words or synonyms for toye

mcwhinnie    0.714470

greatorex    0.692068

hawkesworth    0.691239

divall    0.681963

codron    0.681494

hudd    0.677762

maidment    0.673791

havers    0.671137

rintoul    0.670374

gauntlett    0.669064

Top 30 analogous words or synonyms for toye

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Fred Toye He has also directed episodes of: "Lost", "Ghost Whisperer", "Brothers & Sisters", "The 4400", "Moonlight", "V", "", "Chuck", "The Good Wife", "Falling Skies", "Person of Interest", and other series.
Joe Toye Toye joined Easy Company, 2nd Battalion, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division, to fight in World War II. He made his first combat jump on D-Day of Operation Overlord, as part of the Allied invasion of France. He was known as the "toughest of the tough" and was one of the most respected soldiers in the company.
Clive Toye In the 1984 finals Toye's Blizzard would face his former club the Chicago Sting. A few weeks earlier the Sting had announced they were leaving the NASL after the playoffs concluded. Just before the finals got underway, Toye made some comments regarding his hope for an all-Canadian finals that were taken by some in the media to be "anti-Sting" instead. Toye, who himself was part of the fight to keep the league afloat, appeared to have defused the situation during a half-time interview of Game 1 of the finals in Chicago. However, in the immediate aftermath of the Sting's championship clinching victory in Game 2, his actions appeared to be those of a sore loser. He refused to honor the long-standing tradition of entering the winning locker room to congratulate the victors. Toye followed that up by taking verbal jabs at Chicago coach Willy Roy and star Karl-Heinz Granitza in the press, referring to them as "cheats" and the Sting as "unworthy champions" among other things. He also said that Toronto did not deserve to lose. Not surprisingly, Granitza responded in-kind. In the end, the lack of sportsmanship mattered little, as Chicago walked off into the sunset with the trophy and the NASL ceased operations the following year with Toye as its interim president.
John Toye Toye was born into a musical family. His father was the conductor and composer Geoffrey Toye, and his mother was Dorothy Fleitman. As a child, he spent time in America and was once rescued from a cruise ship torpedoed en route to Britain during the Second World War. He studied classical music in America and spent time living with Navajo Native Americans before attending drama school in London.
Wendy Toye Toye married Edward Selwyn Sharp in 1940; they divorced in 1950. She was awarded the Silver Jubilee Medal in 1977, and appointed a Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) in 1992 for services to the arts. She was made an honorary D. Litt. in 1996 by the City University. Wendy was the subject of "This Is Your Life" in 1991 when she was surprised by Michael Aspel at the Wimbledon Theatre.
Wendy Toye She died on 27 February 2010 at Hillingdon Hospital, Greater London.
Robert Toye Robert Vernon Toye, (b 1948?) nicknamed "Blind Bob" is a US bank robber who is legally blind.
Robert Toye Toye was born in San Pedro, California and developed retinitis pigmentosa in the early age. In 1968 he begin a mail scam where people would send him $5 application fee to receive work stuffing envelopes. 1973 he was sentenced for mail fraud and jailed in Springfield, Missouri. In prison he heard that bank tellers in federally insured banks were instructed to hand out the money to robbers without incident.
Francis Toye In 1939 Toye was appointed director of the British Institute of Florence, but the outbreak of World War II forced him to leave Italy in 1940. During the war, he served as director of the Sociedade Brasileira de Cultura Inglesa, Rio de Janeiro. Toye returned to the institute in Florence in 1946. He retired in 1958 but continued to live in Florence for the rest of his life.
Francis Toye Toye was educated at Winchester and Trinity College, Cambridge, where he studied languages. He was intended for a career in the diplomatic service, and passed the Foreign Office examination for student interpretership in the Levant in 1904. He resigned from the service in 1906 and studied singing and composition with teachers including E. J. Dent.