Top 10 similar words or synonyms for theaetetus

phaedo    0.859048

cratylus    0.846748

charmides    0.845556

timaeus    0.843230

protagoras    0.838948

parmenides    0.835084

menexenus    0.834755

thrasymachus    0.827044

critias    0.821392

philebus    0.806444

Top 30 analogous words or synonyms for theaetetus

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Theaetetus Theaetetus (Θεαίτητος) is a Greek name which could refer to:
Theaetetus (mathematician) Theaetetus was one of the few Greek mathematicians who was actually a native of Athens. Most Greek mathematicians of antiquity came from the numerous Greek cities scattered around the Ionian coast, the Black Sea and the whole Mediterranean basin.
Theaetetus (mathematician) The crater Theaetetus on the Moon is named after him.
Theaetetus (dialogue) In this dialogue, Socrates and Theaetetus discuss three definitions of knowledge: knowledge as nothing but "perception", knowledge as "true judgment", and, finally, knowledge as a "true judgment with an account." Each of these definitions is shown to be unsatisfactory.
Theaetetus (dialogue) Socrates declares Theaetetus will have benefited from discovering what he does not know, and that he may be better able to approach the topic in the future. The conversation ends with Socrates' announcement that he has to go to court to face a criminal indictment.
Theaetetus (dialogue) Socrates thinks that the idea that knowledge is perception must be identical in meaning, if not in actual words, to Protagoras' famous maxim "Man is the measure of all things." Socrates wrestles to conflate the two ideas, and stirs in for good measure a claim about Homer being the captain of a team of Heraclitan flux theorists. Socrates dictates a complete textbook of logical fallacies to the bewildered Theaetetus. When Socrates tells the child that he (Socrates) will later be smaller "without losing an inch" because Theaetetus will have grown relative to him, the child complains of dizziness (155c). In an often quoted line, Socrates says with delight that "wonder (thaumazein) belongs to the philosopher". He admonishes the boy to be patient and bear with his questions, so that his hidden beliefs may be yanked out into the bright light of day.
Theaetetus (dialogue) After distinguishing between knowledge and true judgement, Theaetetus recalls being told that true judgement 'with an account ("logos") equates to knowledge (201d). Things without an account are 'unknowable', while things with an account are 'knowable'.
Theaetetus (dialogue) Socrates concludes the dialogue by announcing that all the two have produced is mere "wind-eggs" and that he must be getting on now to the courthouse to face his trial being brought against him by Meletus.
Theaetetus (dialogue) When Socrates sums up what they have agreed on so far, it becomes problematic that knowledge is sense perception, for Socrates raises the question that "When the same wind blows, one of us feels cold and the other not?" As a result, he introduces the idea of Heraclitean flux to act as a defense to the wind objection. Heracliteanism shows that "Nothing is in itself just one thing...Everything is in a process of coming to be". Thus as there is no fixed meaning in things, but they draw their meaning in a referential difference to other things, the wind objection can be incorporated into Theaetetus's claim that "Knowledge is sense perception". As a result, they can then continue their inquiry as to the truth of this claim. It is important to note that the Heraclitean doctrine of Flux is not the same as the Protagorean doctrine. The Protagorean is radical truth relativism whereas the Heraclitean is radical reality relativism. It serves as a supporting theory to the Protagorean interpretation of Theaetetus's claim, in order that they might fully inquire as to the validity of this premise. Socrates admits that it is unfortunate that Protagoras is dead and cannot defend his idea against people such as himself. He says that the two of them are "trampling on his orphan" (164e) but the charge remains.
Theaetetus (dialogue) Since Protagoras is dead, Socrates puts himself in the sophist's shoes and tries to do him the favor of defending his idea (166a-168c). Socrates concedes that if Protagoras were still alive, he would have more to say in his own defense, and that they are now essentially mistreating "his orphan child." Putting words in the dead sophist's mouth, Socrates declares that Protagoras asserts with his maxim that all things are in motion and whatever seems to be the case, is the case for the perceiver, whether the individual or the state.