Top 10 similar words or synonyms for samvedic

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Top 30 analogous words or synonyms for samvedic

Article Example
Shakatambika Among the 28 Vyas till now, Maharshi is the 20th Vyas. Gautam was one of the disciples of Vyas muni among the samvedic culture taught by him. This was prestigious branch of samved culture amongst other nine branches.
Kadodi language Kadodi (Devanagari:कादोडी बोली), or Samvedi (Devanagari:सामवेदी बोली), is the language spoken by the Samvedi Brahmins & Kupari community in Vasai, Maharashtra, India. It is also called Samvedic. It may be a divergent dialect of Konkani, with Marathi and Gujarati influence.
Kupari Kupari ( referring to the father of one's godchild; word derived from "Kumpari" and feminine being "Kumari" or Portuguese "Comadre") or Samvedi Christians are a sub-group of East Indian community. This community is concentrated mostly in Bassein (), India, which is about north of Mumbai. Kupari Ancestors were Mixture of Samvedic Brahmins, Goans and Portuguese because of inter marriages between them. The population is about 40,000 to 45,000. The language spoken by the Kupari community is called Kadodi, which is a mixed dialect of Marathi, Konkani, and with very few words derived from Portuguese. 97% of this population is Roman Catholic, and the remaining minority is a mixed population of various Christian Protestant sects. Education along with religion and missionary works has helped upliftment of the Samvedi Christian community.
Malaysian Indians Following the Portuguese colonisation of Malacca (Malaysia) in 1511, the Portuguese government encouraged their explorers to bring their married Indian women who were converted already to Roman Catholic Christianity, under a policy set by Afonso de Albuquerque, then Viceroy of India. These people were Goan Catholics (Konkani Catholics) and East Indians (Catholics of Marathi descent). Kuparis who were of mixed Samvedic Brahmin, Goan and Portuguese descent also arrived. Sinhalese and their children from Portuguese that include Portuguese Burghers from Portuguese Ceylon also came later. Their children already intermarried with Malay population, losing their ethnic identities. British acquisition of Penang, Melaka, and Singapore - the Straits Settlements from 1786 to 1824 started a steady inflow of Indian labour. This consisted of traders, policemen, plantation labourers and colonial soldiers (see sepoys). Apart from this there was also substantial migration of Indians to work in the British colonial government, due to their general good command of the English language.
Indian Singaporeans Following the Portuguese colonisation of Malacca (Malaysia) in 1511, the Portuguese government encouraged their explorers to bring their married Indian women who were converted already to Roman Catholic Christianity, under a policy set by Afonso de Albuquerque, then Viceroy of India. These people were Goan Catholics (Konkani Catholics) and East Indians (Catholics of Marathi descent). Kuparis who were of mixed Samvedic Brahmin, Goan and Portuguese descent also arrived. Sinhalese and their children from Portuguese that include Portuguese Burghers from Portuguese Ceylon also came later. Their children already intermarried with Malay population, losing their ethnic identities. Indian contact was rekindled from 1819 to World War II, when both India and Singapore were under British colonial rule. Unlike earlier forms of contact, this led to mass migration and, eventually, the formation of a large, settled and distinct population. By 1824, Singapore's first census counted 756 Indian residents, or about 7% of the total population. In 1826, official figures give a total population of 13,750, of which 1,021 are Indians – 244 from Bengal and 777 from the Coromandel Coast, most of whom were males.