Top 10 similar words or synonyms for pʰ_tʰ

tʃʼ    0.938830

affricate_voiceless    0.936014

tʃʰ    0.934162

voiced_affricate    0.933613

ejective_pʼ    0.932461

alveolar_velar    0.931555

pʼ_tʼ    0.930937

glottal_nasal    0.930581

aspirated_pʰ    0.926910

qʷʼ    0.926886

Top 30 analogous words or synonyms for pʰ_tʰ

Article Example
Bzhedug Adyghe dialect In the Bzhedug sub-dialect, like the Shapsug, there exists a series of aspirated consonants (// // /ʃʰ/ /t͡sʰ/ /t͡ʃʰ/ /t͡ʂʰ/ /t͡ɕʰʷ/ /kʰʷ/ /qʰ/ /qʰʷ/) that became plain consonants in other dialects:
Osage language The historically aspirated series * * *kʰ is seldom realized with aspiration today. Before back vowels they are , and before front vowels (written "pš ch kš"). Some speakers from Hominy assimilate "tx" to or .
Shapsug Adyghe dialect In the Shapsug sub-dialect (like the Bzhedug) there exists a series of aspirated consonants (// // /ʃʰ/ /t͡sʰ/ /t͡ʃʰ/ /t͡ʂʰ/ /t͡ɕʰʷ/ /kʲʰ/ /kʰʷ/ /qʰ/ /qʰʷ/) that became plain consonants in others:
Hainanese The phonological system of Hainanese corresponds well with that of Hokkien, but it has had some restructuring. In particular, etymological *anterior plain stops have undergone implosivization (*p > , *t > , etymological *aspirated stops have spirantized (* > , * > , *cʰ > *kʰ > ), and etymological *s have hardened into stops (*s > ), and *h > . Additionally, some dialects have , and is allophonic with .
Ancient Macedonian language From the few idiomatic words that survive, only a little can be said about special features of the language. A notable sound-law is that the Proto-Indo-European voiced aspirates (/bʰ, dʰ, gʰ/) sometimes appear as voiced stops /b, d, g/, (written ), whereas they are generally unvoiced as /, , kʰ/ () elsewhere in Greek, barring a few exceptions.
Sak language Kadu has twenty consonants: /p, t, k, ʔ, , , kʰ, tɕ, tɕʰ, sʰ, s, ɕ, h, m, n, ɲ, ŋ, l, y, w/. The final consonants need to be nasals /m, n, ŋ/ or voiceless stops /p, t, k, ʔ/.
Tshangla language The above table generally describes onset consonants. Consonant clusters in the onset position are limited to consonant plus /r/, with the exception of the syllable /pɕi/, used on only two contexts. Intervocalic positioning of aspirated onsets // //, and /kʰ/ results in lenition to /ɸ/, /θ/, and /x/ or /h/, respectively, with some exceptions. Syllable-final consonants are limited to /p/, /t/, /k/, /s/, /m/, /n/, and /ŋ/.
Pemako Tshangla dialect The above table generally describes onset consonants. Consonant clusters in the onset position are limited to consonant plus /r/, with the exception of the syllable /pɕi/, used on only two contexts. Intervocalic positioning of aspirated onsets // //, and /kʰ/ results in lenition to /ɸ/, /θ/, and /x/ or /h/, respectively, with some exceptions. Syllable-final consonants are limited to /p/, /t/, /k/, /s/, /m/, /n/, and /ŋ/.
Southern Quechua The most salient distinction between Ayacucho Quechua and the others is that it lacks the aspirated (tʃʰ, , , kʰ, qʰ) and ejective (tʃʼ, pʼ, tʼ, kʼ, qʼ) series of stop consonants. The other varieties of Bolivia and Southern Peru taken together have been called Cusco–Collao Quechua (or "Qusqu–Qullaw"); however, they are not monolithic. For instance, Bolivian Quechua is morphologically distinct from Cusco and Ayacucho Quechua, while North Bolivian is phonologically quite conservative compared to both South Bolivian and Cusco so there is no bifurcation between Ayacucho and Cusco–Collao.
Fuyu Kyrgyz language Although a complete phonemic analysis of Girgis has not been done, Hu and Imart have made numerous observations about the sound system in their tentative description of the language. They describe Girgis as having the short vowels noted as "a, ï, i, o, ö, u, ü" which correspond roughly to IPA , with minimal rounding and tendency towards centralization. Vowel length is phonemic and occurs as a result of consonant-deletion (Girgis /pʉːn/ vs. Kyrgyz /bygyn/). Each short vowel has an equivalent long vowel, with the addition of /e /. Girgis displays vowel harmony as well as consonant harmony. The consonant sounds in Girgis, including allophone variants, are . Girgis does not display a phonemic difference between the stop set /p, t, k/ and /b, d, g/; these stops can also be aspirated to [, , kʰ] in Chinese loanwords.