Top 10 similar words or synonyms for mixtecan

otomanguean    0.863882

totonacan    0.847579

zapotecan    0.841373

zoquean    0.839018

popolocan    0.836639

surmic    0.827239

misumalpan    0.820298

chibchan    0.800901

saliban    0.797819

panoan    0.795428

Top 30 analogous words or synonyms for mixtecan

Article Example
Mixtecan languages The Mixtecan languages constitute a branch of the Otomanguean language family of Mexico. They include the Trique (or Triqui) languages, spoken by about 24,500 people; Cuicatec, spoken by about 15,000 people; and the large expanse of Mixtec languages, spoken by about 511,000 people. The relationship between Trique, Cuicatec, and Mixtec, is an open question. Unpublished research by Terrence Kaufman in the 1980s supported grouping Cuicatec and Mixtec together.
Mixtecan languages The "urheimat" of the Otomanguean family may be the valley of Tehuacán (Puebla). This site was one of the places of the domestication of maize. The thousand-year presence of Otomanguean-speaking groups in this region makes it probable that they were active in this domestication process, which favored the inhabitants of the Altiplano's transition to a sedentary lifestyle and thus influenced the development of Mesoamerican civilization. Campbell and Kaufman have proposed that the Otomanguean languages began to diverge about 1500 BCE. The difficulty of establishing more general relationships between the eight subgroups of the family presents a difficulty for making more detailed inferences on the historical development of the languages.
Mixtecan languages Rensch revised the reconstruction work of Longacre. He revised the probable phonological inventory and described some of his proposals, based on comparisons of the cognates in the Mixtecan languages. After this work, he proposed a reconstruction of the phonological system of Proto-Mixtecan. This proposal contains sixteen consonants, four vowels, and four tones.
Mixtecan languages Proto Otomanguean has been reconstructed by Robert E. Longacre and Calvin Rensch. The phonological system of the protolanguage has nine consonants, four vowels, and four tones. The groups of consonants and the diphthongs formed from this limited repertory would have been the origin of the phonemes in the daughter protolanguages of the various subgroups of Proto-Otomanguean. Some of the most significant changes in the diversification of Proto-Otomanguean phonemes into Proto-Mixtecan phonemes are the following:
Mixtecan languages Longacre (1957) had reconstructed the following consonant inventory for proto-Mixtecan:
Robert E. Longacre 1957. Proto-Mixtecan. International Journal of American Linguistics 23(4), Part 3:1-195.
Mixtec The Mixtecan languages (in their many variants) were estimated to be spoken by about 300,000 people at the end of the 20th century, although the majority of Mixtec speakers also had at least a working knowledge of the Spanish language. Some Mixtecan languages are called by names other than Mixtec, particularly Cuicatec (Cuicateco), and Triqui (or Trique).
Mixtec writing Some examples of surviving Mixtec writing lie in the Codex Zouche-Nuttall, which is now preserved in the British Museum. The Codex Zouche-Nuttall records a multitude of Mixtecan events, including some of the Mixtecan conquests between the 11th and 12th centuries, as well as some of the alliances forged. Despite this, it was made sometime in the 14th century.
Huamelulpan (archaeological site) The Mixtecan languages (in their many variants) were estimated to be spoken by about 300,000 people at the end of the 20th century, although the majority of Mixtec speakers also had at least a working knowledge of the Spanish language. Some Mixtecan languages are called by names other than Mixtec, particularly Cuicatec (Cuicateco), and Triqui (or Trique).
Indigenous people of Oaxaca The Mixtec inhabit Oaxaca, Guerrero and Puebla in a region known as La Mixteca. The Mixtecan languages form an important branch of the Otomanguean language family.