Top 10 similar words or synonyms for levanstell

raysville    0.777268

landeron    0.757099

patourel    0.749142

mottee    0.746501

rougetel    0.734448

lacheur    0.727868

troquer    0.722509

sagaga    0.717762

resouvenir    0.717645

brassus    0.713339

Top 30 analogous words or synonyms for levanstell

Article Example
Petite Etoile Petite Etoile returned to one mile for her last two races. In September, she was an easy winner of the Scarborough Stakes at Doncaster. Later in the same month she was beaten half a length by Le Levanstell when starting 2/9 favourite for the Queen Elizabeth II Stakes at Ascot.
Ragstone (horse) On his first appearance as a four-year-old Ragstone contested the Aston Park Stakes over thirteen and a half furlongs at Newbury Racecourse in May. He tracked the leader King Levanstell (fourth in the previous year's St Leger) before taking the lead a furlong from the finish and won comfortably despite looking less than fully fit. King Levanstell went on to win the Queen Alexandra Stakes at Royal Ascot. Two weeks later Ragstone was moved up in class for the Henry II Stakes over two miles at Sandown Park Racecourse. Starting the 4/11 favourite he pulled hard in the early stages but took the lead in the last quarter mile and "cantered" to an easy victory over Tameric and Thomas Jefferson.
Levmoss Levmoss was a bay horse bred in Ireland by the McGrath Trust Company, a breeding organisation run by his owner and trainer Seamus McGrath. His sire was the McGrath-owned Le Levanstell, who won the Sussex Stakes and the Queen Elizabeth II Stakes in 1961 before a successful stud career. Levmoss's dam, Feemoss came from a strong staying family, being a daughter of the Yorkshire Oaks winner Feevagh and a half-sister of the Queen Alexandra Stakes winner Laurence O. After, Levmoss, Feemoss went on to produce the Prix de Diane winner Sweet Mimosa and the champion stayer Le Moss.
My Swallow My Swallow was a big, powerful bay horse standing 16.3 hands high with a white blaze and white socks on his hind legs bred in Ireland by Myles Walsh. His sire was the Seamus McGrath-owned Le Levanstell, who won the Sussex Stakes and the Queen Elizabeth II Stakes in 1961 before a successful stud career. His best winner prior to My Swallow was Levmoss, who won the Ascot Gold Cup and Prix de l'Arc de Triomphe in 1969. My Swallow was the second foal of his dam Darrigle, whose other winners included the Premio Pisa winner Drobny.
Le Moss Le Moss was a chestnut horse with a narrow white blaze and three white socks bred in Ireland by the Irish-based McGrath Trust Company, a breeding organisation run by Joseph McGrath. His sire was the McGrath-owned Le Levanstell, who won the Sussex Stakes and the Queen Elizabeth II Stakes in 1961 before a successful stud career. Le Moss's dam, Feemoss came from a strong staying family, being a daughter of the Yorkshire Oaks winner Feevagh and a half-sister of the Queen Alexandra Stakes winner Laurence O. Feemoss had previously produced the Prix de l'Arc de Triomphe winner Levmoss and the Prix de Diane winner Sweet Mimosa.
Sarah Siddons (horse) Sarah Siddons was a "strong, lengthy, attractive" bay mare with a white star bred in France by his owner, Meg Mullion's Ardenode Stud. Her sire was the Seamus McGrath-owned Le Levanstell, who won the Sussex Stakes and the Queen Elizabeth II Stakes in 1961 before a successful stud career with his best offspring including Levmoss and Le Moss. Le Levanstell was a representative of the Byerley Turk sire line, unlike more than 95% of modern thoroughbreds, who descend directly from the Darley Arabian. Sarah Siddons was the first of only three fosls produced by Mariel, a high-class mare who won the Pretty Polly Stakes, and was placed in the Irish 1000 Guineas, Epsom Oaks and Irish Oaks. Mariel's dam Ela Marita won the Fred Darling Stakes and the Musidora Stakes and was a half-sister to Ragusa. The filly, named after the great actress Sarah Siddons, was sent into training with the veteran Paddy Prendergast at his stables near the Curragh in Ireland.
Buoy (horse) The blinkers were left off when Buoy started 11/10 favourite for the Great Voltigeur Stakes (a trial race for the St Leger) at York Racecourse in August. He took the lead in the straight and held off a challenge from the Gordon Stakes winner Duke of Ragusa to win by three-quarters of a length. In the St Leger at Doncaster Racecourse in September the blinkers were reapplied and Buoy wore them in most of his remaining races. His opponents included Ragapan, Duke of Ragusa, the Epsom Derby runner-up Cavo Doro and the French challenger Valuta (Prix Kergorlay). He took the lead two furlongs out but was overtaken by the 28/1 outsider Peleid who won easily by two and a half lengths, with Buoy holding on to second place, just ahead of Duke of Ragusa and King Levanstell. On his final appearance of the season, Buoy was sent to France to contest the Prix de l'Arc de Triomphe at Longchamp Racecourse on 7 October. He raced just behind the leaders but was unable to quicken in the straight and finished eighth of the twenty-seven runners behind Rheingold.