Top 10 similar words or synonyms for ischigualastia

mosasaurine    0.823404

grangeri    0.814240

globidens    0.812434

geosaurus    0.812422

merycoidodon    0.811489

eurhinosaurus    0.811061

nomingia    0.811000

mixosaurus    0.809056

didelphodon    0.808127

eryops    0.806677

Top 30 analogous words or synonyms for ischigualastia

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Ischigualastia Ischigualastia was a dicynodont (a group of synapsids) that lived during the Carnian age of the Late Triassic Period. From the Ischigualasto Formation of Argentina, it was a member of the family Stahleckeriidae.
Ischigualastia It was a common member of the local fauna, although not as abundant as the medium-sized herbivores "Scaphonyx" and "Exaeretodon". The only danger to such a huge animal was the almost equally large carnivorous pseudosuchian "Saurosuchus" and perhaps the predatory dinosaur "Herrerasaurus", which shared the same environment. It is likely that pressure from this predator pushed "Ischigualastia" into extinction, for it becomes less common and finally disappears in the higher levels of the Ischigualasto Formation. A somewhat smaller relative or descendant, "Placerias", survived in Laurasia.
Ischigualastia It was a large quadrupedal herbivore, most common at the base of the Ischigualasto Formation.
Ischigualastia An enormous dicynodont, with a short, high skull, and lacking tusks. It is regarded as larger than its later, more famous relative "Placerias", which was up to long and weighed one to two tonnes (1.1 to 2.2 short tons).
Placerias "Placerias" was one of the largest herbivores in the Late Triassic, measuring up to long and weighing up to a tonne (1000 kilograms). with a powerful neck, strong legs, and a barrel-shaped body. There are possible ecological and evolutionary parallels with the modern hippopotamus, spending much of its time during the wet season wallowing in the water, chewing at bankside vegetation. Remaining in the water would also have given "Placerias" some protection against land-based predators such as "Postosuchus". "Placerias" used its beak to slice through thick branches and roots with two short tusks that could be used for defence and for intra-specific display. "Placerias" was closely related to "Ischigualastia" and similar in appearance.
Pisanosaurus The Ischigualasto Formation was a volcanically active floodplain covered by forests, with a warm and humid climate, though subject to seasonal variations including strong rainfalls. Vegetation consisted of ferns, horsetails, and giant conifers, which formed highland forests along the banks of rivers. "Herrerasaurus" remains appear to have been the most common among the carnivores of the Ischigualasto Formation. Sereno (1993) noted that "Pisanosaurus" was found in "close association" with therapsids, rauisuchians, archosaurs, "Saurosuchus" and the dinosaurs "Herrerasaurus" and "Eoraptor", all of whom lived it its paleoenvironment. Bonaparte (1976) postulated that "Pisanosaurus" played a role in a fauna dominated by therapsids. The large carnivore "Herrerasaurus" may have fed upon "Pisanosaurus". Herbivores were represented by rhynchosaurs such as "Hyperodapedon" (a beaked reptile); aetosaurs (spiny armored reptiles); kannemeyeriid dicynodonts (stocky, front-heavy beaked quadrupedal animals) such as "Ischigualastia"; and traversodontids (somewhat similar in overall form to dicynodonts, but lacking beaks) such as "Exaeretodon". These non-dinosaurian herbivores were much more abundant than early dinosaurs.
Eubrachiosaurus "Eubrachiosaurus" is known only from the holotype specimen FMNH UC 633, a partial left scapula as well as a left humerus, and left pelvis which have been lost. It was collected at the Little Popo Agie River, near Lander, Fremont County from the Popo Agie Formation of the Chugwater Group. "Eubrachiosaurus browni" was first described and named by Samuel Wendell Williston in 1904 along with "Brachybrachium brevipes". Lucas and Hunt (1993) considered both taxa junior synonyms of "Placerias hesternus", which is known from the same formation, a position maintained in most subsequent studies. The synonymy of "Eubrachiosaurus" and "Placerias" was questioned by Long and Murry (1995) who noted that the ectepicondyle of "Eubrachiosaurus" was enlarged as in "Ischigualastia". All of Williston's dicynodont material from Popo Agie has been lost, apart from the partial left scapula of "Eubrachiosaurus". Kammerer "et al." (2013) redescribed the available material and the missing elements were redescribed from photographs taken by Williston (1904), and suggested that "Eubrachiosaurus" is a valid member of the Stahleckeriinae, most closely related to "Sangusaurus".
Sanjuansaurus Studies suggest that the paleoenvironment of the Ischigualasto Formation was a volcanically active floodplain covered by forests and subject to strong seasonal rainfalls. The climate was moist and warm, though subject to seasonal variations. Vegetation consisted of ferns ("Cladophlebis"), horsetails, and giant conifers ("Protojuniperoxylon"). These plants formed highland forests along the banks of rivers. "Sanjuansaurus" lived in the jungles of Late Triassic South America alongside early dinosaurs, "Eoraptor", "Herrerasaurus", "Chromogisaurus", and "Panphagia", as well as "Saurosuchus", a giant land-living rauisuchian (a quadrupedal meat eater with a theropod-like skull); the broadly similar but smaller "Venaticosuchus", an ornithosuchid; and the predatory chiniquodontids. Herbivores were much more abundant than carnivores and were represented by rhynchosaurs such as "Hyperodapedon" (a beaked reptile); aetosaurs (spiny armored reptiles); kannemeyeriid dicynodonts (stocky, front-heavy beaked quadrupedal animals) such as "Ischigualastia"; and therapsid traversodontids (somewhat similar in overall form to dicynodonts, but lacking beaks) such as "Exaeretodon". These non-dinosaurian herbivores were much more abundant than early ornithischian dinosaurs like "Pisanosaurus".
Herrerasaurus Studies suggest that the paleoenvironment of the Ischigualasto Formation was a volcanically active floodplain covered by forests and subject to strong seasonal rainfalls. The climate was moist and warm, though subject to seasonal variations. Vegetation consisted of ferns ("Cladophlebis"), horsetails, and giant conifers ("Protojuniperoxylon"). These plants formed lowland forests along the banks of rivers. "Herrerasaurus" remains appear to have been the most common among the carnivores of the Ischigualasto Formation. It lived in the jungles of Late Triassic South America alongside another early dinosaur, the one-meter-long "Eoraptor", as well as "Saurosuchus", a giant land-living rauisuchian (a quadrupedal meat eater with a theropod-like skull); the broadly similar but smaller "Venaticosuchus", an ornithosuchid; and the predatory therapsid chiniquodontids. Herbivores were much more abundant than carnivores and were represented by rhynchosaurs such as "Hyperodapedon" (a beaked reptile); aetosaurs (spiny armored reptiles); and therapsids, including kannemeyeriid dicynodonts (stocky, front-heavy beaked quadrupedal animals) such as "Ischigualastia" and traversodontid cynodonts (somewhat similar in overall form to dicynodonts, but lacking beaks) such as "Exaeretodon". These non-dinosaurian herbivores were much more abundant than early ornithischian dinosaurs like "Pisanosaurus".
Eoraptor During the Late Triassic Period, the Ischigualasto Formation was a volcanically active floodplain covered by forests, with a warm and humid climate, though subject to seasonal variations including strong rainfalls. Vegetation consisted of ferns, horsetails, and giant conifers, which formed highland forests along the banks of rivers. "Herrerasaurus" remains appear to have been the most common among the carnivores of the Ischigualasto Formation. Sereno (1993) noted that "Eoraptor" was found in "close association" with therapsids, rauisuchians, archosaurs, "Saurosuchus" and the dinosaurs "Herrerasaurus" and "Pisanosaurus", all of whom lived in its paleoenvironment. Herbivores were represented by rhynchosaurs such as "Hyperodapedon" (a beaked reptile); aetosaurs (spiny armored reptiles); cynodonts like "Probelesodon", kannemeyeriid dicynodonts (stocky, front-heavy beaked quadrupedal animals) such as "Ischigualastia"; and traversodontids (somewhat similar in overall form to dicynodonts, but lacking beaks) such as "Exaeretodon". These non-dinosaurian herbivores were much more abundant than early dinosaurs. Dinosaur fossils, including those of "Eoraptor" only represent approximately 6% of the total sample that has been recovered from the Ischigualasto Formation (Rogers et al., 1993), which suggests that dinosaurs were less numerous than other tetrapods.