Top 10 similar words or synonyms for affricate_fricative

stop_affricate_fricative    0.944782

glottal_plosive    0.943189

velar_glottal_nasal_plosive    0.940801

plosive_affricate    0.933661

glottal_nasal_stop    0.933467

stop_voiceless_voiced    0.931726

alveolar_postalveolar_palatal_velar    0.931592

fricative_voiceless_voiced    0.931041

bilabial_dental    0.930570

trill_approximant    0.930367

Top 30 analogous words or synonyms for affricate_fricative

Article Example
Braille pattern dots-245 In unified international braille, the braille pattern dots-245 is used to represent a voiced palatal affricate, fricative, or approximant, such as /dʑ/, /ʑ/ or /j/, and is otherwise assigned as needed. It is also used for the number 0.
Lenition The tables below show common sound changes involved in lenition. In some cases, lenition may skip one of the sound changes. The change voiceless stop > fricative is more common than the series of changes voiceless stop > affricate > fricative.
Akhvakh language As with Avar, there are competing analyses of the distinction transcribed in the table with the length sign . Length is part of the distinction, but so is articulatory strength, so they have been analyzed as fortis and lenis. The fortis affricates are long in the fricative part of the contour, e.g. (tss), not in the stop part as in geminate affricates in languages such as Japanese and Italian (tts). Laver (1994) analyzes e.g. as a two-segment affricatefricative sequence ().
Avar language There are competing analyses of the distinction transcribed in the table with the length sign . Length is part of the distinction, but so is articulatory strength, so they have been analyzed as fortis and lenis. The fortis affricates are long in the fricative part of the contour, e.g. (tss), not in the stop part as in geminate affricates in languages such as Japanese and Italian (tts). Laver (1994) analyzes e.g. as a two-segment affricatefricative sequence ().
Huichol language McIntosh described /r/ as "a voiced retroflex alveolar flap" and /z/ as "backed alveolar . . . somewhat retroflex"; "backed alveolar" seems to correspond to the term "postalveolar" in more modern phoneticians' jargon. Among phoneticians, the alveolar ridge is seen as a range, not a point, in the sagittal (front to back) dimension of the roof of the mouth. Phoneticians optionally distinguish between "prealveolar" and "postalveolar" (and likewise between "prepalatal", "midpalatal", and "postpalatal"). It must be understood that in the jargon, "pre-" and "post-" do not have their normal English meanings. "Postalveolar" means "the rear portion of the alveolar ridge", not "a region behind the alveolar ridge", while "prepalatal" means "the front portion of the palate (immediately behind the alveolar ridge)", not "a region in front of the palate". Thus, the descriptions "backed alveolar" and ""somewhat" retroflex" are consistent (perhaps even duplicative). Grimes (1955) described the allophone symbols [r] as "retroflex reverse flap" and [z s] as "retroflex", but he amended this to "apicoalveolar affricate, fricative, and flap /c z r/ (the latter two with retroflex quality)". The description, "reverse flap" was not defined. By way of conjecture, it may mean that the tongue tip (apex) travels up and backward during the flap articulation instead of straight up or up and forward.