Top 10 similar words or synonyms for aakhus

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Top 30 analogous words or synonyms for aakhus

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Patricia Aakhus Aakhus was the Director of the Center for Interdisciplinary Studies and program director of International Studies at the University of Southern Indiana. She also taught classes on classical and world mythology, the history of magic, and international studies.
Patricia Aakhus She earned a BA from the University of California, Santa Cruz, and an MFA from Norwich University.
Patricia Aakhus Her debut novel, "The Voyage of Mael Duin's Curragh", dramatically retells the ancient Irish legend of Mael Duin, an adopted son of a chieftain's widow who accidentally learns of his true parents. He unearths the truth that his mother is a madwoman living in a cave and his father was killed by Viking raiders. He seeks to avenge their death and builds a large curragh, and sets out for the Viking lands with 16 men. They are caught in a storm near enemy territory and drift through mystical islands, which permits the writer Aakhus to increase the magical aspect of the subject matter, as the novel becomes increasingly enchanted with prophetic visionary. Other publications include "Astral Magic in the Renaissance: Gems, Poetry and Patronage of Lorenzo de' Medici." "Magic, Ritual and Witchcraft" and the short story "The Spy" .
Patricia Aakhus She died from cancer in Evansville, Indiana on May 16, 2012, the day before her 60th birthday. She was survived by her husband, two children, three siblings, and other members of her extended family. At that time, she was working on a contemporary novel, "Dogtown".
Patricia Aakhus Patricia "Patty" Aakhus (May 17, 1952 – May 16, 2012), also known by her maiden name and pseudonym, Patricia McDowell, was an American novelist and director of International Studies at the University of Southern Indiana. She specialized in Irish themes and won Readercon's Best Imaginative Literature Award in 1990 and the Cahill Award for "The Voyage of Mael Duin's Curragh".
Patricia Aakhus McDowell was born in Los Angeles in 1952 to Lowell and Betsy (nêe Nichols) McDowell, both of whom preceded her in death, as did a brother, Mark.
Máel Dúin Tennyson's "Voyage of Maeldune", suggested by the Irish romance, borrows little more than its framework. Irish writer Patricia Aakhus wrote a novel recounting the story in 1989, entitled, "The Voyage of Mael Duin's Curragh".
The Voyage of Mael Duin's Curragh The Voyage of Mael Duin's Curragh is a 1990 novel written by Patricia_Aakhus. The novel was Aakhus' first published book, and retells the ancient Irish legend of Mael Duin, an adopted son of a chieftain's widow who accidentally learns of his true parents. The novel retrieved significant acclaim upon its release, including a national review by the New York Times on January 28, 1990.
The Reaper (magazine) The Reaper was a United States literary periodical which played an important role in establishing the poetry movements of New Narrative and New Formalism. It was founded in 1980 and ran until 1989; a double issue of numbers 19 and 20 was the last. "The Reaper" was founded and edited by Robert McDowell and Mark Jarman. It was started at Indiana State University. For the earlier issues the art director was Michael K. Aakhus; for later issues Thomas Wilhelmus served as fiction editor.
Argumentation theory In general, the label "argumentation" is used by communication scholars such as (to name only a few) Wayne E. Brockriede, Douglas Ehninger, Joseph W. Wenzel, Richard Rieke, Gordon Mitchell, Carol Winkler, Eric Gander, Dennis S. Gouran, Daniel J. O'Keefe, Mark Aakhus, Bruce Gronbeck, James Klumpp, G. Thomas Goodnight, Robin Rowland, Dale Hample, C. Scott Jacobs, Sally Jackson, David Zarefsky, and Charles Arthur Willard, while the term "informal logic" is preferred by philosophers, stemming from University of Windsor philosophers Ralph H. Johnson and J. Anthony Blair. Harald Wohlrapp developed a criterion for "validness" (Geltung, Gültigkeit) as "freedom of objections".