Top 10 similarity words for "word"

phrase    0.820684

adjective    0.696712

proverb    0.683861

words    0.678674

noun    0.673252

meaning    0.670207

loanword    0.663198

verb    0.656615

suffix    0.646888

pronunciation    0.628162

Top 30 similarity words relationship with "word"

Article Related Text
Word The task of defining what constitutes a "word" involves determining where one word ends and another word begins—in other words, identifying word boundaries. There are several ways to determine where the word boundaries of spoken language should be placed:
Word In character encoding, word segmentation depends on which characters are defined as word dividers.
Word The difficulty of deciphering a word depends on the language. Dictionaries categorize a language's lexicon (i.e., its vocabulary) into lemmas. These can be taken as an indication of what constitutes a "word" in the opinion of the writers of that language. The most appropriate means of measuring the length of a word is by counting its syllables or morphemes. When a word has multiple definitions or multiple senses, it may result in confusion in a debate or discussion.
Word The term "word" may refer to a spoken word or to a written word, or sometimes to the abstract concept behind either. Spoken words are made up of units of sound called phonemes, and written words of symbols called graphemes, such as the letters of the English alphabet.
Word In synthetic languages, a single word stem (for example, "love") may have a number of different forms (for example, "loves", "loving", and "loved"). However, for some purposes these are not usually considered to be different words, but rather different forms of the same word. In these languages, words may be considered to be constructed from a number of morphemes.
Word In languages with a literary tradition, there is interrelation between orthography and the question of what is considered a single word. Word separators (typically spaces) are common in modern orthography of languages using alphabetic scripts, but these are (excepting isolated precedents) a relatively modern development (see also history of writing).
Word In linguistics, a word is the smallest element that can be uttered in isolation with semantic or pragmatic content (with literal or practical meaning). This contrasts deeply with a morpheme, which is the smallest unit of meaning but will not necessarily stand on its own. A word may consist of a single morpheme (for example: "oh!, rock, red, quick, run, expect"), or several ("rocks, redness, quickly, running, unexpected"), whereas a morpheme may not be able to stand on its own as a word (in the words just mentioned, these are "-s, -ness, -ly, -ing, un-, -ed").
Word Philosophers have found words objects of fascination since at least the 5th century BC, with the foundation of the philosophy of language. Plato analyzed words in terms of their origins and the sounds making them up, concluding that there was some connection between sound and meaning, though words change a great deal over time. John Locke wrote that the use of words "is to be sensible marks of ideas", though they are chosen "not by any natural connexion that there is between particular articulate sounds and certain ideas, for then there would be but one language amongst all men; but by a voluntary imposition, whereby such a word is made arbitrarily the mark of such an idea". Wittgenstein's thought transitioned from a word as representation of meaning to "the meaning of a word is its use in the language."
Word In Indian grammatical tradition, Pāṇini introduced a similar fundamental classification into a nominal (nāma, suP) and a verbal (ākhyāta, tiN) class, based on the set of desinences taken by the word.
Word In English orthography, compound expressions may contain spaces. For example, "ice cream", "air raid shelter" and "get up" each are generally considered to consist of more than one word (as each of the components are free forms, with the possible exception of "get").